HATric (HMI for autonomous vehicles in Traffic)

Project manager
Annie Rydström
Period
2014-08-01 - 2017-06-30

There is a lack of understanding regarding human behaviour and methods to evaluate HMI in partially and highly automated vehicles. HMI design principles that address the particular needs of vehicles capable of at least partially automated driving have yet to be developed. The projects goal is to generate the design principles, test methods and prototypes necessary to concretely understand what constitutes good HMI design for automated vehicles. There are three particular reasons for working with HMI for automation in relation to safety: Optimize hand over of control; Minimize negative effects of automation induced behaviour; Increased usage by improved user experience. In the project, principles and prototypes for controlling the interaction between driver and vehicle will be developed in short iteration cycles and tested, primarily in real cars, and either on test tracks or in regular traffic, depending on which location is most appropriate.

Short facts

Project title: HATric (HMI for autonomous vehicles in Traffic)
Project type:
Research area:
Road user behaviour
Financier(s):
FFI
Partner(s):
Volvo Car Corporation, VTI, Chalmers
Period:
-
Project No:
2014-01411

Project publications

While autonomous vehicle technology progresses, potentially leading to a safer traffic environment, many challenges remain within the area of human factors. One very important factor that must be addressed is to what extent the driver (user)
Author(s)
Fredrick Ekman. Mikael Johansson
Year of publication
2015
Author(s)
Fredrick Ekman, Mikael Johansson, Jana L. Sochor
Published in
The 5th Swedish National Conference on Transport Research, Lund, Sweden, October 18-19, 2016 (2016)
Year of publication
2016
While automated vehicle technology progresses, potentially leading to a safer, more efficient traffic environment, many challenges remain within the area of human factors, such as user trust for Automated Driving (AD) vehicle systems. Previous research has
Author(s)
Fredrick Ekman, Mikael Johansson, Jana L. Sochor
Published in
Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction – NordiCHI’16, Gothenburg, October 23-27, 2016 (2016)
Year of publication
2016
While autonomous vehicle technology progresses, potentially leading to a safer and more efficient traffic environment, many challenges remain within the area of human factors, such as user trust for Autonomous Driving (AD) vehicle systems. The aim
Author(s)
Fredrick Ekman, Mikael Johansson, Jana L. Sochor
Published in
Proceedings of the 95th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C. January 10-14, 2016
Year of publication
2016
A prominent issue in the field of automotive research is the apparent lack of consideration given to the potentially safety-critical differences between novice and experienced users of Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS). Conducting experiments with novices
Author(s)
Martin Krampell
Year of publication
2016

Safer – Vehicle and Traffic Safety Centre

SAFER is the open innovation arena where researchers and expertise work together to create safe mobility. Our traffic safety approach covers people, vehicles and the infrastructure – and together we contribute to safer road transports and smarter, more sustainable cities.

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